Monday, December 28, 2015

PLEASE CONSIDER WATCHING CONTINUUM














Continuum is the best show you've never heard of with all of its episodes available on Netflix, so go watch it now.

Do you want a show that deals with time travel and stopping a bad future like the Terminator franchise, but in a way that actually makes sense?  Do you like the idea of Minority Report dealing with technology's possible misuse by government, but wish the show was actually well-done? Do you want a cutting-edge exploration of technology as both problem and solution like Mr. Robot, but from four years ago and starring Canadians? Well, here you go!

Not to mention, the cast is refreshingly diverse and non-stereotypical. No character is totally good or bad -- everyone has their reasons. In fact our heroine has been happily serving an evil corporate empire, while the "terrorists" she fights (who are pretty damn ruthless) are trying to prevent a dystopian hellscape future. And, thank Cthulhu, she is too busy with her goals to spend much time on juvenile romantic angst (looking at you, Flash and Arrow!).

The only issue I have with the show is that the actors are fine, but a little bland. It's not like watching Orphan Black and thinking, "OMG GIVE TATIANA MASLANY ALL THE AWARDS!" So, it may take a few episodes to grow on you, but give it a chance.

Monday, December 21, 2015

MY LATEST WEIRD ART PROJECT

Victorian & Edwardian Horror

I've been having fun with the Artstudio app for iPad and the Sensu stylus lately. It was coming up on October, and Guillermo del Toro was talking about his favorite horror stories on Twitter (Dude must have been a librarian in a previous life, because his Readers' Advisory game is ON POINT. Go follow him). That inspired me to read 31 of my old favorite Victorian & Edwardian horror stories and draw illustrations for each of them for Halloween. Of course, it took me longer than that, but they are finally finished. I was inspired, in my lazy and casual way, by great illustrators like Aubrey Beardsley, John R. Neill, and Alastair.

 Here is the list of stories:


  • “Caterpillars” -E.F. Benson
  • “Casting the Runes” -M..R. James
  • “The Horla” - Guy de Maupassant
  • “How Love Came to Professor Guildea” -Robert Hichens
  • “Afterward” -Edith Wharton
  • “The Great God Pan” - Arthur Machen
  • Yuki-Onna” - Lafcadio Hearn
  • “Green Tea” - J. Sheridan LeFanu
  • “The Monkey’s Paw” - W. W. Jacobs
  • “Luella Miller” - Mary Wilkins Freeman
  • “Rappacini’s Daughter” - Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • “The Picture in the House” -H.P. Lovecraft
  • “The Yellow Wallpaper” -Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • “The Open Window” -Saki
  • “The Phantom Rickshaw” - Rudyard Kipling
  • “Ancient Sorceries” -Algernon Blackwood
  • “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” - Ambrose Bierce
  • “The Yellow Sign” -Robert W. Chambers
  • “The Voice in the Night” - William Hope Hodgson
  • “The Beckoning Fair One” - Oliver Onions
  • “The Tell-Tale Heart” -Edgar Allan Poe
  • “Adam and Eve and Pinch Me” - A. E. Coppard
  • “The Way It Came” - Henry James
  • “The Captain of the Pole-Star” - Arthur Conan Doyle
  • “The Body-Snatcher” - R.L. Stevenson
  • “What Was It?” -Fitz-James O’Brien
  • “Dracula’s Guest” - Bram Stoker
  • “Good Lady Ducayne” - Mary E. Braddon
  • “The Dream Woman” - Wilkie Collins
  • “The Ghost Ship” - Richard Middleton
  • “Man-Size in Marble” - E. Nesbit



I downloaded all of them from reliable public domain e-book sites like Project Gutenberg, Internet Archive, and University of Adelaide E-books to read on my Nook. (remember, never pay for an e-book published before 1923, folks). You can download them to read here.